Walkie Talkie app disabled by Apple due to vulnerabilities that could allow the iPhone to eavesdrop

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As reported to TechCrunch this evening, Apple has recently disabled the Walkie Talkie app on the Apple Watch due to an unspecified vulnerability that could allow a person to eavesdrop to another customer’s phone without their consent.

The company has already put forward its apology for the bug and also for the inconvenience caused.

The Walkie Talkie app on Apple Watch enables two users who have accepted an invitation from each other to receive audio files and chats through a push to talk interface reminiscent of the PTT buttons on older cell phones.

Apple stated:

“We are just made aware of a vulnerability related to the Walkie Talkie app on the Apple Watch and have currently disabled the functions of the app until we find a way to fix it.” This means the app will be back after some time.

The company was alerted about the bug through its report a vulnerability portal directly. However, currently, there is no evidence of the feature being exploited in the wild.

Apple has taken the decision to temporarily disable the feature until they come up with a fix. The app, however, will be there installed on the devices but it will not work until it is updated with the fix by the company.

Earlier this year there was a bug detected in Apple’s FaceTime. The bug allowed people to listen before a call was accepted. It was first discovered by a teen but however, he didn’t get any response from Apple on the issue.  Later on, Apple fixed the bug and rewarded Thompson a bug bounty. Currently, it seems that the company is paying close attention to all the reports sent to them.

Earlier today, Apple pushed a Mac update in order to remove a feature of the Zoom conference app that allowed it to work around Mac restrictions. It provided a smoother call experience to the users. But the problem was that it also allowed websites and emails to add a user to an active video call without their consent.

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